CERN/LHCC 2003-018
LHCC 63
31 March 2003

 
LARGE HADRON COLLIDER COMMITTEE

Minutes of the sixty-third meeting held on
Wednesday and Thursday, 26-27 March 2003



 
 
 

OPEN SESSION:

1.    LHC Machine Magnet Technologies: Lucio Rossi

2.    ATLAS Status Report: Peter Jenni

3.    XVII Rencontres de Physique de la Vallée díAoste ó Highlights from a Winter Conference: Sandra Leone

4.    Report from the Chamonix XII Workshop: Roger Bailey
 

CLOSED SESSION:

Present: W. Bartel*, S. Bertolucci, K. Borras, M. Calvetti (Chairman), R. Cashmore, A. Ceccucci, J. Dainton,
              F. Ferroni, M. Hauschild, M. Jaffre, Y. Karyotakis, J. Knobloch, M. Mangano, J. Martin, J. May*,
              P. McBride, J. Panman, K. Potter, D. Schlatter*, P. Seyboth, H. Tiecke, K. Tokushuku, E. Tsesmelis (Secretary),
              C. Vallée, V. Vuillemin* (representing D. Schlatter)

 Apologies: J.-J. Gomez Cadenas, Y.-K. Kim

                                                                                                                    *) Part time

    1.   PROCEDURE      2.  INTRODUCTION      3.  REPORT FROM THE ATLAS REFEREES     4.   REPORT FROM THE CMS REFEREES     5.   REPORT FROM THE LHCb REFEREES The LHCC heard a report from the LHCb referees, concentrating on the development of a photodetector for the RICH, the status of the re-optimisation of the LHCb detector, and reports on the DAQ, the schedules and milestones.

The referees reported on the status of the photodetector for the RICH. Concerns remain regarding the bump-bonding and correction of magnetic field distortions for the Hybrid Photo-Diode (HPD), while development of the read-out for the Multi-Anode Photomultiplier (MAPMT) has not yet been completed. Delays in tendering and ordering procedures were noted and add to the urgency in making a final decision. The LHCC re-iterated that focused studies of the HPD and MAPMT should continue with the aim of providing a final choice between the two options to be taken in September 2003. An intermediate review is planned for May 2003 and the LHCC will perform another in-depth review of the status at that time.

Good progress was reported on the re-optimisation studies for the LHCb detector. The production of simulated events is well underway. An alternative Level-1 trigger, to provide more flexibility and scalability, is being investigated and will be reviewed within LHCb in April 2003 with a report to the next session of the LHCC in May 2003. Depending on the changes, an update to the DAQ TDR may be requested by the LHCC. The LHCb Re-optimisation TDR remains on track to be submitted in September 2003.

The referees also reported on the schedules and milestones. The Committee received a new document with updated milestones for the Muon System and Inner Tracker following approval of the respective TDRs. The new list will be henceforth used by the Committee to monitor and regulate future progress of the LHCb project.
 

    6.   COST EVALUATION OF THE LHCb INNER TRACKER TDR AND THE LHCb ADDENDUM TO THE
          MUON SYSTEM TDR W. Bartel reported on the cost evaluation of the LHCb Inner Tracker TDR and of the LHCb Addendum to the Muon System TDR.

The LHCb Inner Tracker is estimated to cost 3.15 MCHF with the 75 man-years of manpower to be provided by the collaborating institutes deemed to be adequate. The cost estimates are based on quotes from industry and prototype work. No extra cost for assembly space, storage space or safety installations are needed, but additional costs for infrastructure may arise at a later stage. The cost is considered to be reasonable and fits into the overall cost of the LHCb experiment.

Replacing the RPC detector planes with MWPCs brings the cost of the system from 10.83 MCHF to 10.98 MCHF. These cost estimates are based on firm quotes from industry and prototype work. The institute manpower identified for the RPCs can be transferred to the MWPC project and the cost of additional manpower from PNPI St. Petersburg is included in the material budget. The manpower is considered to be adequate. The cost is considered to be reasonable and fits into the overall cost of the LHCb experiment.
 

    7.   REPORT ON THE LHC INSTALLATION REVIEWS K. Potter presented a report from the LHC Installation Review meetings held on 12-14 March 2003 regarding the installation of the LHC experiment in their respective underground experimental areas. The Review Committees addressed the projected schedules and milestones, the required resources to carry-out the installation as well as identifying any potential risks for the installation. As stated in the first Installation Reviews in September 2002, it is intended to hold in-depth annual reviews of the progress of installation of all experiments with intermediate follow-up reviews. In all cases a list of items which will allow the Review Committee to follow up outstanding issues and to monitor future progress will be provided.

A follow-up review to that in September 2002 of the installation of the ATLAS experiment in the underground experimental areas at Point 1 of the LHC was held on 12 March 2003. The Review Committee concentrated on the major concerns arising at the September 2002 Installation Review, which are reported in CERN/LHCC 2002-040. The Review Committee was impressed by the progress and work that has gone into the installation plan since the September 2002 review. Many of the concerns raised have been addressed and the position of the Technical Co-ordination clarified. The installation team is clearly in place and working together as a team, making good use of available resources. This follow-up review has not identified any new major concerns, but a few items raised previously were not addressed, understandably, because of lack of time and some studies are clearly on-going. As a result of this present follow-up review, ATLAS is invited to consider a set of issues detailed in the report CERN/LHCC-2003-015 that should be addressed in greater detail in September 2003. In conclusion, the ATLAS technical coordination has the installation programme well in hand, but it remains a formidable task with a considerable risk of schedule delays. An on-going effort is required to ensure that there is a working detector at Point 1 ready for first collisions in Spring 2007.

Similarly, on 12 March 2003 the LHCC held a follow-up review to that in September 2002 of the installation of the CMS experiment in the underground experimental areas at Point 5 of the LHC. The Review Committee concentrated on the major concerns arising at the September 2002 Installation Review which are reported in CERN/LHCC 2002-028rev. The Review Committee was impressed by the progress and work that has gone into the installation plan since the September 2002 review. All of the concerns raised have been addressed and the Technical Co-ordination is making good progress within the available resources. There were no new major concerns in this follow-up review. As a result of this present follow-up review, CMS is invited to consider the set of issues given in the report CERN/LHCC-2003-016 that should be addressed in greater detail in September 2003. In conclusion, the CMS technical coordination has the installation programme well in hand, but delays in the arrival of certain sub-detectors may make it difficult to complete the installation and leave adequate time for global commissioning. Nonetheless, it is expected that CMS will have a working detector in time for first collisions in Spring 2007.

The first of the LHCC Installation Reviews of ALICE took place on 14 March 2003. The Review Committee was impressed by the amount of work which has already gone into the installation planning of the ALICE experiment and considers that a good over all scheme has already been developed, but also has to draw attention to the fact that a great deal of work remains to be done. Particular attention should be given by the core installation team to the co-ordination of the activities of the many different sub-detector teams of ALICE. The concerns of the Review Committee at this time are given in CERN-LHCC 2003-014. It is hoped that they will allow the Review Committee to follow up outstanding issues and to monitor future progress. The Technical Coordination was judged to have the installation of the ALICE detectors well in hand, but there is some risk of schedule delays as a result of the late completion and installation of some sub-detectors. In conclusion, the construction and installation has started well. More work is needed in particular on detector services and cabling and on the final stage DAQ commissioning, but there is every reason to believe that ALICE will have a useful, working detector ready for first collisions in Spring 2007.

Finally, the first of the LHCC Installation Reviews of LHCb took place on 13 March 2003. The Review Committee was impressed by the amount of work which has already gone into the installation plan of the LHCb experiment and considers that a good over all scheme has already been developed, but also has to draw attention to the fact that a great deal of work remains to be done. The concerns of the Review Committee at this time are given in CERN-LHCC 2003-017. They will allow the Review Committee to follow up outstanding issues and to monitor future progress.

The Technical Coordination was judged to have the installation of the LHCb spectrometer well in hand, but there is some risk of schedule delays as a result of the unavoidable interleaving with machine installation. In conclusion, the construction and installation has started well. More work is needed in particular on detector services and cabling and on the final stage DAQ commissioning, but there is every reason to believe that LHCb will have a complete and working detector ready for first collisions in Spring 2007.
 

    8.   REPORT FROM THE LHCC MAGNET ADVISORY GROUP T. Taylor presented a report from the Magnet Advisory Group (MAG) review meeting held on 5-6 February 2003 on the status of the LHC spectrometer magnets.

The ALICE and LHCb dipole magnets are both on track and the reported costs are within the budget estimates. The LHCb dipole coils have been produced and delivered to CERN, while the steel plates for the yoke are in fabrication and delivery to CERN is on-going. Installation work at Point 8 has started with the magnet support structures being assembled. Manufacture of the coil for the ALICE dipole magnet has started and the yoke has been machined and assembled at Dubna.

Assembly of the CMS solenoid magnet is well underway on the surface at Point 5. The MAG is fully satisfied with progress on the yoke and end-caps of the magnet as well as with the cryogenic infrastructure. Good progress was also reported for the conductor since the continuing welding process works very well, thus allaying previous concerns. The LHCC noted the concerns related to the coil and in particular the delay in the mandrel production. The coil is thus 4 months late with respect to the V33 CMS schedule. The estimated delay can be reduced from 4 to 2 months by speeding up production of the coil. The full current underground magnet tests may have to be sacrificed in order to compensate the above two-month delay in the magnet coil. However, the LHCC wish to emphasise that the functional tests, cooldown, electrical checks and leak tests on the cold magnet, must be preserved. The MAG will re-appraise the situation in June.

The ATLAS magnet system consists of 4 large superconducting magnets ó the Central Solenoid (CS), the Barrel Toroid (BT) and the two End Cap Toroids (ECT). The CS coil, turret and chimney were delivered to CERN in 2001. Good progress was reported on components of the BT, including the conductor, coil, integration of the coil in its casing, vacuum vessel, integration into the cryostat, and the cryo-ring. Concern remains with the delay in delivery of the thermal shields, as this may result in a delay of the BT. The MAG considers the schedule to be tight but feasible. Good progress was also reported on the conductor, vacuum vessel and cold mass of the ECT. The MAG considers that the ECT schedule is no longer critical as final assembly is expected to be on time. Finally, the MAG noted the major effort put into containing costs and introducing savings.
 

    9.   TEST BEAMS The SPS and PS Coordinator reported on the test beams.

Hardware tests at the PS start-up showed high unacceptable leakage currents in two bending magnets of the PS machine. Although spare magnets are available, and are currently being tested, a delay in the start-up of the PS and SPS is most probable, and will affect all CERN accelerator-related physics activities. Specifically for the LHC test beams, the delay may have consequences for the irradiation periods and ALICE tests in the PS East Hall and may result in a shorter overall SPS proton run. Discussions are on-going to limit the impact of the delays and a new PS and SPS machine schedule will be released shortly. The LHC experiments are requested to provide information to the SPS and PS Coordinator on their plans for using the LHC-type beams in 2003 as a change from their original request will have an impact on the new SPS schedule.

Finally, the SPS and PS Coordinator showed a possible schedule for the SPS heavy-ion run, whereby agreement was reached between CMS and ALICE to run together with NA45 and NA49. The schedule will be submitted for approval to the Research Board in April.
 

    10.  ALICE COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW The third of the LHCC Comprehensive Reviews of ALICE took place on 24-25 March 2003. The LHCC referees addressed the following systems and areas: Inner Tracking System, Particle Identification, Time Projection Chamber, Calorimeters, Dimuon Forward Spectrometer, Forward Detectors, Trigger and Control, DAQ and Higher Level Trigger, Software and Computing, Physics, and the topics of Management, Technical Coordination, Integration, Schedules and Costs.

Since the second of the Comprehensive Reviews in March 2002, the ALICE Collaboration has made very significant progress towards the realisation of an experimental set-up ready to record proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. The LHCC considers it reasonable to expect ALICE to be ready for first LHC operation in April 2007. In particular, most of the detector technologies to be used, together with the associated electronics, have successfully gone through the R&D phase and several major sub-systems, such as the Time Projection Chamber, dipole magnet and support structures, are in the production phase, while others, such as the Inner Tracking System, Transition Radiation Detector, Time-of-Flight detector and Dimuon Forward Spectrometer, are preparing to enter the series production phase. This is being done with the Collaboration adopting measures to control increases in the cost-to-completion. Moreover, the LHCC considers that ALICE has addressed satisfactorily the concerns of the LHCC at the second Comprehensive Review.

The conclusions and concerns of the LHCC are given below. They will allow the Committee to follow-up outstanding issues and to monitor future progress of this project in upcoming sessions of the LHCC prior to the next ALICE Comprehensive Review one year hence.

    11. DATES FOR LHCC MEETINGS Dates for 2003:                    21-22 May
                    2-3 July
                    24-25 September
                    26-27 November The LHCC received the following documents * restricted circulationEmmanuel Tsesmelis
Eómail: LHCC.Secretary@CERN.CH  Tel. 78949, 164057

LHCC Secretariat: Janet Grant (Bldg. 14/4-022) Tel. 73424, janet.grant@CERN.CH